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      Delivering Innovative Medicines: Small Changes Can Have a Large Effect, featuring Dr. Wendy Young of Genentech in Stanford


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      November 14, 2019

      Thursday   6:00 PM - 9:00 PM

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      EVENT DETAILS
      Delivering Innovative Medicines: Small Changes Can Have a Large Effect, featuring Dr. Wendy Young of Genentech

      Title: Delivering Innovative Medicines: Small Changes Can Have a Large Effect Guest Speaker: Dr. Wendy Young, Senior VP of Small Molecule Drug Discovery at Genentech Abstract: Creative medicinal chemistry design coupled with smart organic chemical syntheses and methodologies lead us to successful drug candidates. This seminar will provide several vignettes from Genentech small molecule drug discovery with snap shots of where small changes in structure had profound effect on the compounds profile. Highlights of medicinal chemistry, drug metabolism, drug delivery challenges and our solutions will be shared. Biography: Wendy Young is senior vice president of small molecule drug discovery at Genentech. She oversees an organization of 400 scientists in chemistry, drug metabolism, pharmaceutics and biochemical pharmacology. Wendy is a chemist by training and has spent the last 25 years engrossed in the discovery of inhibitors of a variety of protein classes to treat cancer, cardiovascular and immunology indications and under her leadership numerous drug candidates have progressed into clinical trials. She was the project team leader and co-inventor of fenebrutinib, a BTK inhibitor, which is currently in Phase II clinical studies in RA, lupus, and urticaria. In 2018, she was awarded the Genentech Inventors Award for this work. She has authored over 70 research papers and published patent applications. Wendy received a B.A./M.S. degree in 1989 from Wake Forest University having studied in the labs of Huw M.L. Davies. She then received a Ph.D. in 1993 from Princeton University, under the guidance of Edward C. Taylor. At Princeton, and in collaboration with Eli Lilly, Wendy worked on folate analogs as antitumor agents and Alimta® was an outcome of this collaboration. Thereafter, as an American Cancer Society fellow, she performed post-doctoral studies in the laboratories of Samuel Danishefsky at Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center and was part of the team that completed the total synthesis of Taxol®.Wendy is a strong advocate for students and women in STEM careers, and has initiated several programs to support these important under-represented groups. In 2015, Wendy was recognized by the San Francisco Business Times as one of San Franciscos Most Influential Business Women of 2015. Wendy has been a longtime supporter of the American Chemical Society having served many roles on the executive MEDI division and in 2017 was the elected National Chair. In 2018, Wendy was awarded an ACS Fellows Award for her lifelong service to chemistry, society, and medicine and in 2019 the ACS National Earle B. Barnes Award for Leadership in Chemical Research Management for scientific creativity and dedication to programs and people.


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